andrew

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  • in reply to: Haslemere/Farnham – cannot decide #20744

    andrew
    Member

    Knowing both areas, Farnham is a much more happening place with a more London style community all while enjoying unparalleled access to the countryside. Grayswood is a lovely village but if you are coming from Town and have a young daughter I would suggest you will find more like minded people in Farnham and more to do.

    If you want property advice contact dandewar@burnsand webber.com 01252 713868 He lives in and knows the area very well

    Andrew

    in reply to: Commuting from Farnham #20244

    andrew
    Member

    Melanie hi. Last year they built a new double story parking lot literally beside the station. Lots of people (my daughter being one) have season tickets and seem to be able to get a spot each day first thing in the morning. In addition,there are some residential roads within half a mile or so of the station where there is still some uncontrolled parking.

    If you are going to be seriously looking for property in the area, do have a word with my sone Dan Dewar 01252 713868. He runs my Farnham estate agency office of Burns and Webber and covers Dippenhall and Crondall as part of his area.

    Good luck.

    Andrew

    in reply to: Nurseries Farncombe or Brookwood Areas #19590

    andrew
    Member

    Hi Dan

    Please see below information which we hope will help with your decision making.

    The nursery at closet proximity, and there the kindest from a logistical viewpoint is Busy Bees Nursery which is situated in nearby Knaphill. In addition the Nursery has an excellent reputation with families with young children in the area.

    Brookwood station is also very popular with the discerning commuter as you are often much more likely to get a seat during the rush hour. Brookwood station is the station before Woking where the vast majority of commuters board. 

    http://www.busybeeschildcare.co.uk/nursery/woking

    Major Minors has an ‘outstanding’ Ofsted status, which is one of the very few in Surrey. The cost is around £75 per day (8am-6/6:30pm). The cost will vary a few pounds depending on age etc. There is potential that you can arrange a 7:30am drop off on request. You would need to be on the 7:26am train for a 9am start, but the 7:56am for a 9:30am start would work. However these trains are based on Farncombe. There may be better options by driving into Godalming as the trains are more frequent.

    I believe all the prices for the Farncombe nurseries are very similar. Ladybirds nursery and Rocking Horse nursery have a good reputation but don’t look as ‘polished’ as Major Minors. It may be worth joining ‘Godalming mummas/parents’ on Facebook, people are always commenting and asking for recommendations.

    Most schools do breakfast clubs and after school clubs which help with the extended hours. Little Rays is an after school club in Godalming which do pickups from the schools. They also run clubs during the half term breaks/holidays – plenty of parents have recommended this as the children seem to love it!

    If you need any more help please don’t hesitate to contact either our Woking Curchods office or our Godalming Burns & Webber office.

    Woking Curchods: 01483 776644

    Godalming Burns & Webber: 01483 427101 

    in reply to: Alton – help me out! #19355

    andrew
    Member

    Candy Alton provides better value for value than some of the other, perhaps more attractive towns surrounding the area. It is a friendly place to live and I do think that the council will one day wake up and smell the coffee about improving it overall. But when I couldn’t say.

    Schools are good and there are some very respectable areas to live in there.I am sure its a safe as any of the other prettier towns in the area. The point someone made about the train is valid. You will get a seat!

    You said in your initial request for help;

    “We’re now in a position where we need to decide whether we compromise on property or location”

    My advice would be to be very careful compromising on location. Moving is stressful and expensive so try and get it right first time. As they say in the carpentry world Measure twice cut since!!

    You can always alter a property but there isn’t ever much opportunity to alter an area you decide isn’t where you want to live.

    If you have not yet done a detailed investigation into mortgages, it might be worth doing so as it could lead you to being able to spend a little more and buy a better location.

    Good luck.

    Andrew

    in reply to: Bookham/Horsley/Effingham #19155

    andrew
    Member

    Howard Effingham catchment area. See link
    http://www.thehoward.org/Information/Catchment-Area/

    Bookham and Effigham are small, friendly communities with a cheaper selection (still nice) of properties and areas, compared to Cobham and East Horsley. I have to say the whole area is very nice (always some bits to avoid but typically in housing the prices generally dictate the better areas.So your budget in relation to what you need as a property will perhaps dictate which areas you focus on.

    Moving out of London (albeit only just in Earlsfield), this area will give you the necessary distance from London living, without making you feel you have moved to the wilds of Alaska!

    The best advice I can give you( because I am an estate agent and know the rules of the journey to move home and areas) is to make with contact with good local estate agents (Neil or Patrick at my Cobham office 01932 860999, Curchods Estate Agents) and get to know them and they you. Let them know all there is to know about your situation,needs,likes dislikes, budget timescales etc. They will make it easy for you. True experts with vast local knowledge and a reputation for outstanding customer service.

    Good luck

    Andrew

    in reply to: Buying a 1900 cottage #18898

    andrew
    Member

    Sparkles hi. A few things that worry me from your post.

    It doesn’t sound like you like the property much.You do need to like what you buy,even if there are bits to be done. It’s not good news to live somewhere you don’t like. Frankly it would be better to live further from the station in something you actually like and buy a bike!

    No harm in buying something that needs a load of work so longs the following are checked out.

    Structurally sound. You should check for subsidence history, roof damp and timber issues especially.
    Establish accurate costs on the work you want to do (several estimates)
    Be sure what you want to do can be done engineering wise.
    Be sure none of it needs planning permission but if it does, obtain that first.
    Get some handle on why it seems “cheap” Nothing around here ever sells ‘cheap” unless there is a reason.

    If the basics are good and the area is good, then there is no reason why you should not buy it and do some work. So long as you don’t overspend for the area and/style/size of property, your money will grow as the market moves on. But don’t expect to make a “fast buck’ by selling on soon after doing the work. That is unlikely to work for you.

    If you want more help feel free to make contact

    Andrew

    in reply to: Woking Primary schools – Westfield & Barnsbury #18588

    andrew
    Member

    Jessica go to http://www.curchods.com, then info and schools. That will give you some good intel school by school.

    Our local office informs me both are good schools. Here is a link to Barnsbury PTA website. I can’t find a Westfield PTA website

    http://www.barnsbury.surrey.sch.uk/parents/pta/

    in reply to: Moving out London with developed business #18419

    andrew
    Member

    Wow big question. You can go North east South or west of London and have gorgeous places to live.
    I think you need a menu of parameters to work with such as;

    The task of trying to find a property in half a dozen different locations is almost impossible You need to narrow it down to a favourite location (e.g. surrey or Hants Berks)

    Distance from London
    Price you can afford to do this get your property valued and check out accurately what mortgage you can get.
    Accommodation you desire
    Availability of that accommodation within that price band in a chosen area
    Schools there
    Local facilities – is local shop and post office enough to be close to or do you want to be close to/in, a big town e.g. Woking Guildford, Hemel Hempstead, Chingford etc
    Do you have any family in any of the Home Counties

    These are a few key things that you need to get your mind round initially. Doing so will save you weeks months maybe of time chasing the wrong areas.

    If you are coming to surrey let me know i have 21 offices covering residential property in Surrey http://www.curchods.com

    Andrew

    in reply to: Lawyers in Chichester Godalming Guildford? #18418

    andrew
    Member

    Speak to Emelia Hale at Penningtons Guildford. 01483 411493 emelia,hale@penningtons.co.uk. She may be able to offer a suggestion or two

    in reply to: Where do we move too? Dorking? #18297

    andrew
    Member

    Laura HI. I think you may be underestimating your husband’s journey if you lived in Dorking and he worked in Slough. He would be using one of the most congested sections of the M25/M4 and getting onto the M25 can be a very time consuming task.

    Farnham, Fleet, Church Church Crookham, Camberley,Sandhurst, Bracknell, as examples, and other places south (or North) of the M4 may make mores sense. Even from there, Slough can be a journey in rush hour. But those locations mentioned all allow relatively easy train access to London.

    in reply to: Early Retiree trying to decide Dorking, Godalming or Farnham #18149

    andrew
    Member

    Mitch as a 30 year long resident of Fsrnham, I am slightly biased, but I have also been an estate agent in Surrey for 40 years,do I do have something more to go on.

    Of the three I believe Farnham is the most modern with at radio al but up to date buzz. The other two always remind me of The border towns of Scotland,a bit dated and old fashioned.

    It is a very pretty place to live with a great deal going on socially and with easy access to London,airports,coast and motif way networks. Both Godalming and Dorking are a tad more remote, though neither too far.

    I think it’s much more down to you coming and seeing first hand what they respectively have to offer and deciding if any gives you that ” feel” If not there are lots of other towns and villages around.

    In terms of property prices,they are all pretty similar, so not a great deciding factor for one or another.

    If you need any property advice you can contact me on acd@burnsandwebber.com

    Good luck.

    in reply to: Want to move – but unsure where! #18037

    andrew
    Member

    Laura you sound quite confused if you should or shouldn’t leave London.To help a bit in working it out here is an idea followed with some practical advice on how to tackle things if you decide to move out.

    Big sheet of paper and list down all the great things about living in London and then all the bad things. Which list is the biggest? This could help focus your thinking

    Next another list. Note down all the things you think you might gain by leaving London and all the things you think you would miss. Again the physical size of those columns could be helpful to focus on a decision.

    You can take all the advice you like, at the end of the day the decision will be yours and your husband/partner.

    It is an expensive business, which involves considerable personal upheaval and so needs careful thought. My experience of having been a Surrey agent for nearly 40 years, is that I do not know one of the hundreds of people I have dealt with that moved out of London,who has moved back. Quite a few moved again within Surrey several years later as their needs changed.

    One slightly safer route financially and less disruptive personally, could be to rent for a while. Choose an area you like and rent for a year and see “how it is”. It would probably still need to be somewhere that you and your husband /partner could stay in the same jobs and commute to, but it would be a way of sampling “Life after London’ without a full fat commitment.

    If you do decide to move and Surrey is on the cards, GUILDFORD is a very popular choice for people wishing to move out of London but still need a buzz.It’s quite civilised, great shops, restaurants,pubs,theatre a cathedral and really easy to get back to London, and access the motorways and the airports (Gatwick and Heathrow each about 35 minutes drive)

    As for the order try in how to go about a move here are a few tips.
    1. establish your Motivation, Needs and Timescale for a move.
    2. If these really check out, next, find out accurately how much you will have to spend on your next purchase. This information could well determine where you will search and ultimately move to.
    3. To do this, have several valuations of your existing property (assuming you are intending to sell it to buy) The real value will likely lie in the middle somewhere so chop of the lowest and highest. 4. Then seek proper independent mortgage advice to find out just what you can borrow. I say independent as that will give you a comprehensive sweep of the multitude of deals out there.Going back only to your existing lender gives you only their offering.
    5. Armed with the math,look around various areas to see what that will buy you. Does it allow you to buy what you need/want? If the answer is yes, visit those areas and see where gives you the best “feel factor”.
    6. Next, if the timescale is determined and it’s say within 6 months, place your existing property on the market now and see if you can find a buyer (ideally before going out and finding something you fall in love with, as this is the wrong way round as you will be under pressure from the off)
    7. In choosing your selling agent, don’t be tempted to go with the agent who quotes the highest price or the lowest fee necessarily. Choose someone who impresses you with their communication,knowledge and personality. test them on their negotiating skill. Ultimately it’s this that will end up putting the most money into your bank account at the end of the transaction.The company should be visible in your price sector demonstrating good selling success.

    8. In order to be in as much control of the process as possible,especially if at any stage things need to be expedited, at the same time as you put your property on the market,instruct your solicitor to prepare the conveyancing paperwork.If you are a leasehold property this is absolutely vital, as the information required by a buyer’s solicitor regarding management and maintenance can take weeks/months to come from the management company or their agents, acommon log jam in getting an exchange of contracts on leasehold properties. And again for leasehold properties,check out too how long your lease is.Less than 70 years or so, may well cause a lender for a buyer an issue and so you may need to extend it before selling

    9. With a buyer secured, you are now ready to go hunting but also negotiating. Your strong buying position may not get you thousands off an asking price,(it could if the property you wish to buy is owned by someone in a hurry!) but it might put you at the head of the queue if there are several people interested in the property you might like to buy.
    10. When you agree a purchase,instruct your solicitor, apply for your mortgage and I would strongly recommend that you have a building survey of some description done, to be sure you are making a sound investment structurally. You don’t want any nasty,expensive surprises after you move in. Many people make the mistake that a mortgage valuation is a survey. It’s not.

    Those basics will give you the best chance of having a smooth, cost effective transaction.
    If you want any more help feel free to contact me acd@curchods.com. And if you are coming to Surrey I have 19 estate agency offices to help you.
    Good luck
    Andrew

    in reply to: Unsure whether to move back – feel unsettled and homesick #17943

    andrew
    Member

    Kate a sad story in many ways. I’m sorry you haven’t settled.I suggest rent again for say 6 months and evaluate things for a bit longer. The fact you say you “have to be out of your rented place by March” suggests to me there is even more pressure to make a decision and under pressure you might make the wrong one.

    It sounds like you are at a multi-crossroads looking at all the signs and you actually don’t know anything about any of the places they point and so have no foundation upon which to base any sound decisions.

    Slow it down, relax and see if you can put a structure to your thought process about where to settle.

    Don’t worry too much about the kids being bored with nothing to do. There is always something to do for kids and it will be 8/10 years before them being bored will be a problem. A lot can change in such a time span. That said, you sound bored right now.

    A few questions to challenge yourself with that might help put some shape to some answers in your dilemma.

    What finally took you over the line to leave London? Will those issues exist if you went back?

    Will you be lonely returning to N London where you say you now don’t know anyone?

    Is your other half feeling the same, or is he more settled than you?

    What is actually missing that you want from where you live right now?

    Why did you go there in the first place?

    If you had bought where you are now, would you be thinking seriously of selling again and returning to London? Or is it made a bit easier to consider this (and so more confusing maybe) because you are only renting?

    Have you established how much you have to spend,what you actually want in a family house and where you can actually afford to buy such an animal?

    Have you done a simple list of all the good things versus all the bad things about where you live right now (not the actual property as clearly you will not be staying in that long term) Sometimes the list is so biased one way that the physical weighting makes a decision easier.

    In the same vein, what would you miss most from the list of good things about where you are now (child minder will certainly be on that list!)

    Have you thought to return to N London whilst kids are still so small and RENT there to test how it feels living there again? Might be revealing one way or another!

    And to put a wider, more psychological spin on the matter try this. Sounds like you are rich with some amazing gifts, with your other half, baby number 1 already here,and baby number 2 on the way. You could potentially be happy anywhere!!

    Good luck. If you stay in Surrey feel free to contact me to help your search. acd@curchods.com. We have aver 700 properties in the county for sale currently.

    Andrew

    in reply to: Moving out of London #17893

    andrew
    Member

    GUILDFORD is a very popular choice for people wishing to move out of London.It’s quite civilised, great shops, restaurants,pubs,theatre a cathedral and really easy to get back to London, and access the motorways and the airports (Gatwick and Heathrow each about 35 minutes drive)

    As for the order try this as blue print.

    Step 1. establish your Motivation, Needs and Timescale for a move. If these really check out, next, find out accurately how much you will have to spend on your next purchase. This information could well determine where you will search and ultimately move to.

    To do this, have several valuations of your existing property (assuming you are intending to sell it to buy) The real value will likely lie in the middle somewhere so chop of the lowest and highest. Then seek proper independent mortgage advice to find out just what you can borrow. I say independent as that will give you a comprehensive sweep of the multitude of deals out there.Going back only to your existing lender gives you only their offering.

    Then armed with the math,look around various areas to see what that will buy you. Does it allow you to buy what you need/want? If the answer is yes, visit those areas and see where gives you the best “feel factor”.

    Next, if the timescale is determined and it’s say within 6 months, place your existing property on the market and see if you can find a buyer (ideally before going out and finding something you fall in love with, as this is the wrong way round as you will be under pressure from the off)

    In choosing your selling agent, don’t be tempted to go with the agent who quotes the highest price or the lowest fee necessarily. Choose someone who impresses you with their communication,knowledge and personality. test them on their negotiating skill. Ultimately it’s this that will end up putting the most money into your bank account at the end of the transaction.The company should be visible in your price sector demonstrating good selling success.

    To be in as much control as possible of the process,especially if at any stage things need to be expedited, at the same time as you put your property on the market,instruct your solicitor to prepare the conveyancing paperwork.If you are a leasehold property this is absolutely vital, as the information required by a buyer’s solicitor regarding management and maintenance can take weeks/months to come from the management company or their agents, acommon log jam in getting an exchange of contracts on leasehold properties. And again for leasehold properties,check out too how long your lease is.Less than 70 years or so, may well cause a lender for a buyer an issue and so you may need to extend it before selling

    With a buyer secured, you are now ready to go hunting but also negotiating. Your strong buying position may not get you thousands off an asking price,(it could if the property you wish to buy is owned by someone in a hurry!) but it might put you at the head of the queue if there are several people interested in the property you might like to buy.

    When you agree a purchase,instruct your solicitor apply for your mortgage and I would strongly recommend that you have a building survey of some description done, to be sure you are making a sound investment structurally. You don’t want any nasty,expensive surprises after you move in. Many people make the mistake that a mortgage valuation is a survey. It’s not.

    Those basics will give you the best chance of having a smooth, cost effective transaction.

    If you want any more help feel free to contact me acd@curchods.com. And if you are coming to surrey I have 19 estate agency offices to help you.

    Good luck

    Andrew

    in reply to: Moving out of London, but where to?! Advice please! #17849

    andrew
    Member

    Hi there. I am Andrew Dewar from Curchods Estate Agents we have 19 Surrey offices. For sure what you are looking for is available aplenty. “Where” you should concentrate your search may depend on your budget. For example Esher, Cobham and Weybridge are quite a bit more expensive than Woking, West Byfleet and Guildford.All however have great local facilities and great train times to Waterloo.

    The other factor is that you really need to “feel” something about an area and so I would suggest if you have not done so, set aside some time to come down and spend a weekend here (stay in an hotel and then travel round) and see if anywhere naturally makes you feel more comfortable.

    The web will give you a vast inside into the likely prices to pay per area. If you would like some specific location advice feel free to contact me or any of my offices. http://www.curchods.com Good luck.

    Andrew

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